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My Journey to Joy Led Me Home

The world came crashing in when I left my job as a public relations professional in 2014 to become a stay-at-home mom. I'd always pictured myself as a career woman. I was in a successful job, climbing the corporate ladder, and within a year or two, was planning to make vice-president at the public relations firm where I worked. I had big dreams for myself and my life. When we had our first son, however, the dream changed. All the perfectionist, workaholic tendencies that previously defined my work transferred to my home. Suddenly, I wanted to cook elaborate dinners and have freshly folded laundry every day and buy organic groceries. I wanted to be the  picture-perfect wife and mother. In reality, I was tired and exhausted, my home was a wreck, and I failed in my marriage more times than I could count. 

I struggled to find joy. Our home had no life because I had no life. Who was I, really? When I wasn't performing? When I wasn't creating? When my work wasn't being noticed? When I wasn't being noticed.

Suddenly, I didn't know anymore. 

What I've learned in the years since is this: joy is possible anywhere. Whether you live in a shack or a mansion, whether you're a successful entrepreneur or a teacher or a fledgling blogger like me. Joy can be your reality when your hope isn't grounded in how well you're achieving or performing or how clean your house is. True joy is grounded in the grace of Savior who already loves and accepts you as you are. Grace frees you to embrace where you are right now, whether that's changing the millionth diaper, or cooking dinner, or washing dishes. It doesn't matter if your home is a wreck and dinner is Chick-fil-A for the third time this week. It's not about performing. It's not about achieving. It's about embracing God's grace that frees you to abundant life and overflowing joy. It's about recognizing that you are already seen and loved.

This Joyous Home is a safe place for women everywhere who are tired of trying to live up to the expectations placed on them by both society and themselves. It's a place where grace is the new perfect.